Choosing LAP BAND to Deal with Obesity

Body weight always becomes attention. When the weight is normal, then no one is going to worry about it. In this case, when it is an over weight, of course it will start to get attention. Over weight and obesity can be a big problem. It can make the performance bad and no one wants to be fat. The worse problem is related to the body health. Over weight is like opening doors to various serious health problems. High cholesterol is one of them. Then, it can also lead to the heart attack and other else. These are serious and it is the reason why people are afraid of over-weight problem. When they find that their body becomes fatter and bulkier, then they will star to find a way to lose weight.

Doing exercise and planning a diet can be a good way. However, it is a good way to prevent those kind of over weight problem. When it has been an obesity, working hard on exercise cannot really help. Exercise and diet program may be helpful, but the result may not be as fast as what is expected. In this case, there is a good way. Surgery is the way.

Forming Your Muscles

People want to look good. Looking good does not only depend on how your faces look, but also your body. Especially for men, many of them want to look muscular. In order to look strong, many men join fitness programs in many places, hiring instructors to help them forming their bodies, especially their muscles. There are actually three keys of a good-looking and muscular body. They are: good nutrition, regular workouts, and good rest.

First key is good nutrition. You have to satisfy your body’s need of calories. A healthy diet will bring you many benefits. First is to eat enough protein, fat, and vitamin. Consuming white eggs during breakfast is good not only for your health, but also for your energy. Oatmeal is also good for preparing your body do some activities during a day. While bananas are essential to support your antibody and energy. For breakfast, eat two packs of L-Men Amino and one slice of papaya to support your body. For lunch, eat red rice and some chicken slices. One slice of apple and 2 packs of L-Men Amino are good as snacks during lunch. Last but not least, consume red beans, red rice, fish, and

Finding Cheap Hotel in Jakarta

If you are travelling to Jakarta, make sure that you visit all the listed places and attraction that we will tell you about. But before we go that way, don’t forget to always remember to provide yourself with a decent accommodation when you are traveling and staying in Jakarta. This place will be your home in the couple of days or weeks so make sure it is comfortable. If you are a student backpacker you will need some guidance to find the cheap hotel in Jakarta which will not drain your money in a night while the city transportation and all will worth more to visit places and taste delicious food in Jakarta.

Places to visit in Jakarta are mostly located in the central of Jakarta which is around National Monument (Monas), there are a lot of museum and historical places that will give you information about the history of Indonesia and how Jakarta that has been standing since two centuries ago plays a big role in the formation of Indonesia and the economy of the country. You will be pleased by the easily accessed location by many public transportation around such as commuter line, bus, taxi, car, etc.

The dangers risks of binge drinking

fbfsrbsrfbbResearchers estimate that each year 1,825 college students ages 18-24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle collisions. About 20 percent of college students meet the criteria for an alcohol use disorder, with one in four college students report adverse academic consequences from drinking, including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall.

“Alcohol abuse, binge drinking in particular, is thought to be a rite of passage for college students; but in reality it’s a very serious health epidemic in the United States,” said Peter Hendricks, Ph.D., associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health Department of Health Behavior. “It is important to understand what alcohol is, why it’s problematic, and what a person can do to minimize the risk should they choose to drink.”

Understanding alcohol

Moderate drinking, as defined by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, is no more than one drink per day for women and no more than two drinks per day for men, translating to seven or fewer drinks per week for women and 14 or fewer drinks

When it comes to predicting depression

dvdzvdvDepression can strike anyone, taking a toll on mental and physical health, friendships, work and studies. But figuring out who’s at risk for it is still a murky task.

A new University of Michigan study suggests that standard ways of looking for depression risk may not work as well among blacks as they do among whites. But listening to how blacks describe their own mental health could help, the study suggests.

In a paper newly published online in Frontiers in Public Health, a researcher from the University of Michigan Medical School and School of Public Health, and his colleague, report results from a new analysis of long-term data from the nationally representative Americans’ Changing Lives study.

The participants studied — 2,205 whites and 1,156 blacks — took a standard depression screening test at the start of their involvement in the long-term tracking study, based at the U-M Institute for Social Research. Called the CES-D and used around the world for decades, it asked them a range of quick questions about their emotions, sleep, appetite, and energy levels.

Fifteen years later, they underwent a

Huge problems faced by parents of children with autism

vdsvdvdParents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) face severe challenges in accessing adequate services, according to a survey of hundreds of parents in the United Kingdom.

Just 11 per cent of parents felt that the NHS professionals they encountered understood their concerns about the behaviour and healthcare challenges of their child. The majority, 70 per cent, felt that their child’s symptoms were attributed to ASD and seen as something to “get on with,” rather than being worthy of further investigation and treatment.

Respondents to the survey identified diet and nutrition issues as a major cause for concern, yet just one per cent of parents were able to access services in this area and have their problem resolved. The vast majority, 77 per cent, did not. This is despite the fact that many parents reported health and behavioural progress in their child following dietary changes. Similar patterns were identified in relation to services for gut problems, behavioural challenges, sleep difficulties, and toileting issues.

One parent said: “My son has had multiple physical problems: chronic constipation, self-harming, food intolerances, epilepsy. Yet it is only the epilepsy which has been

Discovery of key abnormality affecting brain development in people with Down syndrome

vfsdbfdbfsFor the first time researchers have identified the lifelong changes in gene expression in the brains of people born with Down syndrome (DS).

The findings, which appear in the journal Neuron, may lead to possible therapies for DS patients.

DS occurs in one out of every 691 live births and is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, affecting approximately 400,000 Americans. The underlying developmental and genetic causes of this intellectual disability in DS are not fully known and because of this lack of knowledge, no treatment is currently available.

A multi-institution team of researchers led by Tarik Haydar, PhD, associate professor of anatomy and neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Nenad Sestan, MD/PhD professor of neuroscience at Yale School of Medicine, compared gene expression in different regions of the brains of humans with DS across development and adulthood. They discovered that the establishment of white matter in the brain, which is the insulation of the brain nerve fibers, (i.e. axons) is altered from toddler to adult periods of development. This finding was unexpected given the current theory that many

Blueberries the well known super fruit could help fight Alzheimers

vdvasvaThe blueberry, already labeled a ‘super fruit’ for its power to potentially lower the risk of heart disease and cancer, also could be another weapon in the war against Alzheimer’s disease. New research being presented today further bolsters this idea, which is being tested by many teams. The fruit is loaded with healthful antioxidants, and these substances could help prevent the devastating effects of this increasingly common form of dementia, scientists report.

The researchers present their work today at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

“Our new findings corroborate those of previous animal studies and preliminary human studies, adding further support to the notion that blueberries can have a real benefit in improving memory and cognitive function in some older adults,” says Robert Krikorian, Ph.D., leader of the research team. He adds that blueberries’ beneficial effects could be due to flavonoids called anthocyanins, which have been shown to improve animals’ cognition.

Currently 5.3 million people suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. But that number is expected to increase, Krikorian notes, as the

Depression is more than a mental disorder

dvadvavAn international team of researchers lead by the University of Granada (UGR) has demonstrated, for the first time, that depression is more than a mental disorder: it causes important alterations of the oxidative stress, so it should be considered a systemic disease, since it affects the whole organism.

The results of this work could explain the significant association that depression has with cardiovascular diseases and cancer, and why people suffering from depression die younger. At the same time, this research may help finding new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of depression.

The lead author of this work is Sara Jiménez Fernández, PhD student at the UGR and psychiatrist at the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit at Jaén Medical Center (Jaén, Spain). The co-authors are the UGR Psychiatry professors Manuel Gurpegui Fernández de Legaria and Francisco Díaz Atienza, in collaboration, among others, with Christoph Correll from the Zucker Hillside Hospital (New York, USA).

A study with 3961 people

This research is a meta analysis of 29 previous studies which comprise 3961 people, and it’s the first detailed work of its kind

Brains gardeners

dvsdvsA new study in the journal Nature Communicationsshows that cells normally associated with protecting the brain from infection and injury also play an important role in rewiring the connections between nerve cells. While this discovery sheds new light on the mechanics of neuroplasticity, it could also help explain diseases like autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and dementia, which may arise when this process breaks down and connections between brain cells are not formed or removed correctly.

“We have long considered the reorganization of the brain’s network of connections as solely the domain of neurons,” said Ania Majewska, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) and senior author of the study. “These findings show that a precisely choreographed interaction between multiple cells types is necessary to carry out the formation and destruction of connections that allow proper signaling in the brain.”

The study is another example of a dramatic shift in scientists’ understanding of the role that the immune system, specifically cells called microglia, plays in maintaining brain function.

Different kinds of physical activity shown to improve brain volume cut Alzheimers risk in half

sdbsdbsdA new study shows that a variety of physical activities from walking to gardening and dancing can improve brain volume and cut the risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 50%.

This research, conducted by investigators at UCLA Medical Center and the University of Pittsburgh, is the first to show that virtually any type of aerobic physical activity can improve brain structure and reduce Alzheimer’s risk. The study, funded by the National Institute of Aging, was published on March 11 in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The researchers studied a long-term cohort of patients in the 30-year Cardiovascular Health Study, 876 in all, across four research sites in the United States. These participants had longitudinal memory follow up, which also included standard questionnaires about their physical activity habits. The research participants, age 78 on average, also had MRI scans of the brain analyzed by advanced computer algorithms to measure the volumes of brain structures including those implicated in memory and Alzheimer’s such as the hippocampus. The physical activities performed by the participants were correlated to the brain volumes and

Dementia plaques attack language center of brain

fbfbfsnThe recent ability to peer into the brain of living individuals with a rare type of language dementia, primary progressive aphasia (PPA), provides important new insights into the beginning stages of this disease — which results in language loss — when it is caused by a buildup of a toxic protein found in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research also offers additional insight into why this type of dementia causes people to lose the ability to express themselves and understand language.

Using a special imaging technique, Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered the toxic build-up of amyloid protein is greater on the left side of the brain — the site of language processing — than on the right side in many individuals living with PPA.

Previously, amyloid accumulation in the brain could only be studied after an individual with Alzheimer’s disease had died. This snapshot in time was after the disease had run its full course, and amyloid had spread throughout the entire brain. Now, a new technology called Amyloid PET Imaging allows researchers to study the build-up of the toxic amyloid during life.

“By understanding

What makes the brain tick so fast

dzvdvdSurprisingly complex interactions between neurotransmitter receptors and other key proteins help explain the brain’s ability to process information with lightning speed, according to a new study.

Scientists at McGill University, working with collaborators at the universities of Oxford and Liverpool, combined experimental techniques to examine fast-acting protein macromolecules, known as AMPA receptors, which are a major player in brain signaling. Their findings are reported online in the journalNeuron.

Understanding how the brain signals information is a major focus of neuroscientists, since it is crucial to deciphering the nature of many brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer’s disease. A stubborn problem, however, has been the challenge of studying brain activity that switches on and off on the millisecond time scale.

To tackle this challenge, the research teams in Canada and the U.K. combined multiple techniques to examine the atomic structure of the AMPA receptor and how it interacts with its partner or auxiliary proteins.

“The findings reveal that the interplay between AMPA receptors and their protein partners that modulate them is much more complex than previously thought,” says lead researcher Derek Bowie, a professor

Nutritional drink can help to conserve memory in case of prodromal Alzheimers disease

b scfbdsbThe study did not find a significant benefit in broad cognitive function (the study primary endpoint). Cognitive decline over the study period was less than originally expected when it was designed ten years ago, so differences found between the two groups were too small to be statistically significant. Project coordinator Professor Tobias Hartmann, Saarland University Germany, explained that this is the most likely reason the primary endpoint was not met.

Professor Hilkka Soininen, Professor in Neurology MD, PhD from the University of Eastern Finland, who headed the clinical trial as part of the LipiDiDiet project, said: “Today’s results are extremely valuable as they bring us closer to understanding the impact of nutritional interventions on prodromal AD which we are now better at diagnosing but unable to treat due to a lack of approved pharmaceutical options.

The LipiDiDiet study illustrates that this nutritional intervention can help to conserve brain tissue and also memory and patients’ ability to perform everyday tasks — possibly the most troubling aspects of the disease. We look forward to the results of subsequent analyses and the six year extension study which

Vascular disease after age 80 associated with greater risk of dementia

fbfdbfbPeople who reach their 80s without cardiovascular disease are more likely to suffer from the effects of dementia than a heart attack or stroke, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. In a small group of participants, an association was also found between zero or low levels of artery-clogging calcium deposits and a low risk of dementia and cardiovascular events, suggesting that the cardiovascular risk factors that lead to coronary heart disease could also affect the brain.

Increasingly successful heart disease prevention and treatment methods have led to longer lifespans, which in turn creates a larger population of older people at risk for dementia. In the United States, dementia mainly affects people over the age of 75.

Researchers in the study looked at individuals over age 80 to determine if coronary artery calcium levels predict risk of death and risk of dementia and coronary heart disease. Beginning in 1998, 532 participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study-Cognition Study were evaluated annually through 2013 for signs of dementia. Coronary artery calcium measurements were also taken. Coronary artery calcium is deposits that

Children Who Are Emotionally Abused May Be More Likely to Experience Migraine as Adults

xfcbfcb c“Emotional abuse showed the strongest link to increased risk of migraine,” said author Gretchen Tietjen, MD, from the University of Toledo in Ohio and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Childhood abuse can have long-lasting effects on health and well-being.”

In the study, emotional abuse was assessed by asking, “How often did a parent or other adult caregiver say things that really hurt your feelings or made you feel like you were not wanted or loved?”

The study included data from 14,484 people age 24 to 32. About 14 percent reported they had been diagnosed with migraines. The participants were asked whether they had experienced emotional, physical or sexual abuse in childhood. Physical abuse was defined as being hit with a fist, kicked, or thrown down on the floor, into a wall, or down stairs. Sexual abuse included forced sexual touching or sexual relations. About 47 percent of the participants answered yes to having been emotionally abused, 18 percent physically abused and 5 percent sexually abused.

Of those diagnosed with migraines, 61 percent said they had been abused as a child. Of those who

Migraine tension headaches and irritable bowel syndrome linked

gdndftnbfdIrritable bowel syndrome is the most common gastrointestinal disorder worldwide and affects up to 45 million people in the United States. Many people remain undiagnosed and the exact cause of the chronic condition is not known. Common symptoms include abdominal pain or cramping, a bloated feeling, gas and diarrhea or constipation.

“Since headache and irritable bowel syndrome are such common conditions, and causes for both are unknown, discovering a possible link that could shed light on shared genetics of the conditions is encouraging,” said study author Derya Uluduz, MD, of Istanbul University in Turkey.

The study involved 107 people with episodic migraine, 53 with tension-type headache, 107 people with IBS and 53 healthy people. Migraine and tension headache participants were examined for IBS symptoms and participants with IBS were asked about headaches.

People with migraine were twice as likely to also have IBS as people with tension headache. A total of 54 percent of those with migraine also had IBS, compared to 28 percent of those with tension headache. Of the participants with IBS, 38 also had migraine and 24 also had tension headache.


Pregnant women with severe migraine may be at increased risk for labor and delivery complications

fsbsdfbsfWomen who have acute migraine attacks that are severe enough to prompt them to seek care may be more likely to have complications when giving birth, including preterm delivery, preeclampsia and low birthweight. Women 35 and older were seven times more likely to have these complications.

These findings, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Health System, will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 68th Annual Meeting on April 15 to 21.

“The results of this study were of particular interest because more than half of the pregnant women with migraine experienced some type of adverse birth outcome, suggesting that these pregnancies should be considered high risk,” said study author Matthew S. Robbins, M.D., director of inpatient services at Montefiore Headache Center, chief of neurology at Jack D. Weiler Hospital of Montefiore, and associate professor of clinical neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. “These findings need to be replicated with a larger number of women, including those who have migraine that does not manifest with severe attacks during pregnancy.”

Acute migraine attacks are disabling headaches with symptoms that may include light and sound

For both men and women pregnancy and alcohol are toxic mix

vzxdvvThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) set off a firestorm of controversy this month when they suggested that women stop drinking alcohol if they are trying to get pregnant, or could get pregnant. Some people took this advice as the CDC prioritizing hypothetical, yet-to-be-conceived children over real women, which has brought up a number of issues from female autonomy to access to birth control — but how clear is the science about what causes fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and related fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)?

Scientists are rather unequivocal on the issue, as it turns out. “Alcohol is probably the worst of all of the drugs in terms of effects on the fetus,” said Rajesh C. Miranda, Ph.D., professor at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. “The data from human studies and from animal models is clear; alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes FAS/FASD, and there is no safe level of consumption and no safe time.”

That said, binge drinking — which surveys show to be a common behavior for both men and women —

Severe headache in pregnant women When to worry

fbfbfbfbIf a pregnant woman with high blood pressure and no history of headache suddenly develops a headache that quickly gets worse, she could be at risk for pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, which put both the mother and fetus at risk. These and other findings from a new study conducted by researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, offer the first clinical recommendations for making diagnostic decisions about headaches in pregnant women. The study, the largest of its kind, was published online in the journal Neurology.

“Headaches during pregnancy are quite common, but it is not always easy to distinguish between a recurring, preexisting migraine condition and a headache caused by a pregnancy complication,” said lead author Matthew S. Robbins, M.D., director of inpatient services at Montefiore Headache Center, chief of neurology at Jack D. Weiler Hospital of Montefiore, and associate professor of clinical neurology at Einstein. “Our study suggests that physicians should pay close attention when a pregnant woman presents with a severe headache, especially if she has elevated blood pressure or lack of past headache history. Those patients